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 Lybia's world conflict (us gets involed)

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PostSubject: Lybia's world conflict (us gets involed)   Thu 7 Apr 2011 - 18:01

Libya, an oil-rich nation in North Africa, has been under the firm, if sometimes erratic, leadership of Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi since he seized power in 1969. But in February 2011, the unrest sweeping through much of the Arab world erupted in several Libyan cities. Though it began with a relatively organized core of antigovernment opponents in Benghazi, its spread to the capital of Tripoli was swift and spontaneous. Colonel Qaddafi lashed out with a level of violence unseen in either of the other uprisings, but an inchoate opposition cobbled together the semblance of a transitional government, fielded a makeshift rebel army and portrayed itself to the West and Libyans as an alternative to Colonel Qaddafi's erratic control.

Momentum shifted quickly, however, and the rebels faced the possibilty of being outgunned and outnumbered in what increasingly looked like a mismatched civil war. As Colonel Qaddafi’s troops advanced to within 100 miles of Benghazi, the rebel stronghold in the west, the United Nations Security Council voted to authorize military action, a risky foreign intervention aimed at averting a bloody rout of the rebels by loyalist forces. On March 19, American and European forces began a broad campaign of strikes against Colonel Qaddafi and his government, unleashing warplanes and missiles in a military intervention on a scale not seen in the Arab world since the Iraq war.

LATEST DEVELOPMENTS:

April 6 Stung by criticism from rebel leaders, NATO officials said that the pace of attacks on the forces of Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi was increasing, after a slight slowdown as the coalition handed off responsibility earlier in the week. Gen. Abdul Fattah Younes, the head of the rebel army, had lashed out at his Western allies during a news conference in Benghazi, accusing NATO of tardiness and indecision.

April 5 Forces loyal to Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi battered rebel fighters on the road outside the strategic oil town of Brega with rocket fire, mortars and artillery, driving them many miles to the north and leaving them in disarray. Colonel Qaddafi’s son, Seif al-Islam, promised in a television interview to usher in a new era of constitutional democracy in which his father would be a mere figurehead “like the queen of England.”

April 4 The United States began to remove its warplanes from front-line missions in Libya and focus on a support role there. The changeover came as diplomatic maneuvering quickened with Turkey announcing efforts to secure a cease-fire and Italy saying it was recognizing the rebels seeking to oust Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi, only the third country to do so. The Obama administration also dropped financial sanctions against Moussa Kousa, the top Libyan official who fled to Britain, saying it hoped the move would encourage other senior aides to abandon Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi, the country’s embattled leader.

April 3 At least two sons of Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi are proposing a resolution to the Libyan conflict that would entail pushing their father aside to make way for a transition to a constitutional democracy under the direction of his son Seif al-Islam el-Qaddafi. At the same time, as the struggle with Colonel Qaddafi threatened to settle into a stalemate, the rebel government here was showing growing strains that imperil its struggle to complete a revolution and jeopardize requests for foreign military aid and recognition.

April 1 A senior aide to one of Col Muammar el-Qaddafi’s sons held secret talks in London with British authorities, adding to the confusion swirling around the Tripoli regime. East of Brega, the Libyan rebels prepared for a further attempt to wrest the momentum of ground fighting away from Colonel Qaddafi’s forces after days of see-sawing advances and retreats. In Washington, President Obama’s top two national security officials signaled that the United States was unlikely to arm the rebels. Members of the NATO alliance said they had sternly warned the rebels not to attack civilians. Timeline: Qaddafi

March 31 Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi’s forces pushed rebels into a panicked retreat and seized valuable oil towns they ceded just days ago under allied airstrikes. Libya’s foreign minister, Moussa Koussa, defected to London, dealing a blow to Colonel Qaddafi’s government even as his forces made military advances. American officials revealed that the Central Intelligence Agency has inserted clandestine operatives into Libya to gather intelligence for military airstrikes and to contact and vet the beleaguered rebels.

March 30 Leaders of four dozen countries meeting in London agreed that Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi would have to relinquish power, even though regime change is not the stated aim of the United Nations resolution authorizing military action against his forces. With the momentum of ground combat tilting in favor of forces loyal to Colonel Qaddafi, rebels seeking to oust him embarked on a large-scale withdrawal from the coastal oil town of Brega, falling back toward the strategically located city of Ajdabiya. The Obama administration engaged in a fierce debate over whether to supply weapons to the rebels, with some fearful that providing arms would deepen American involvement in a civil war and that some fighters may have links to Al Qaeda.

March 29 In his first major address since ordering American airstrikes, President Obama defended the American-led military assault in Libya, saying it was in the national interest of the United States to stop a potential massacre and that the assault would be limited. An array of diplomats and public figures gathered in London to shape their political vision of a post-Qaddafi era. In Libya, rebels seeking the ouster of Colonel Quaddafi traded rocket fire with loyalist forces, who have blunted the insurgents’ westward advance. At the same time, American warplanes appeared to have opened a new line of attack on pro-Qaddafi forces, firing on three Libyan vessels off the contested western port of Misurata.

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PostSubject: how do you know when it comes   Sat 9 Apr 2011 - 11:03

Libya, an oil-rich nation in North Africa, has been under the firm, if sometimes erratic, leadership of Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi since he seized power in 1969. But in February 2011, the unrest sweeping through much of the Arab world erupted in several Libyan cities. Though it began with a relatively organized core of antigovernment opponents in Benghazi, its spread to the capital of Tripoli was swift and spontaneous. Colonel Qaddafi lashed out with a level of violence unseen in either of the other uprisings, but an inchoate opposition cobbled together the semblance of a transitional government, fielded a makeshift rebel army and portrayed itself to the West and Libyans as an alternative to Colonel Qaddafi's erratic control.

Momentum shifted quickly, however, and the rebels faced the possibilty of being outgunned and outnumbered in what increasingly looked like a mismatched civil war. As Colonel Qaddafi’s troops advanced to within 100 miles of Benghazi, the rebel stronghold in the west, the United Nations Security Council voted to authorize military action, a risky foreign intervention aimed at averting a bloody rout of the rebels by loyalist forces. On March 19, American and European forces began a broad campaign of strikes against Colonel Qaddafi and his government, unleashing warplanes and missiles in a military intervention on a scale not seen in the Arab world since the Iraq war.

LATEST DEVELOPMENTS:

April 6 Stung by criticism from rebel leaders, NATO officials said that the pace of attacks on the forces of Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi was increasing, after a slight slowdown as the coalition handed off responsibility earlier in the week. Gen. Abdul Fattah Younes, the head of the rebel army, had lashed out at his Western allies during a news conference in Benghazi, accusing NATO of tardiness and indecision.

April 5 Forces loyal to Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi battered rebel fighters on the road outside the strategic oil town of Brega with rocket fire, mortars and artillery, driving them many miles to the north and leaving them in disarray. Colonel Qaddafi’s son, Seif al-Islam, promised in a television interview to usher in a new era of constitutional democracy in which his father would be a mere figurehead “like the queen of England.”

April 4 The United States began to remove its warplanes from front-line missions in Libya and focus on a support role there. The changeover came as diplomatic maneuvering quickened with Turkey announcing efforts to secure a cease-fire and Italy saying it was recognizing the rebels seeking to oust Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi, only the third country to do so. The Obama administration also dropped financial sanctions against Moussa Kousa, the top Libyan official who fled to Britain, saying it hoped the move would encourage other senior aides to abandon Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi, the country’s embattled leader.

April 3 At least two sons of Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi are proposing a resolution to the Libyan conflict that would entail pushing their father aside to make way for a transition to a constitutional democracy under the direction of his son Seif al-Islam el-Qaddafi. At the same time, as the struggle with Colonel Qaddafi threatened to settle into a stalemate, the rebel government here was showing growing strains that imperil its struggle to complete a revolution and jeopardize requests for foreign military aid and recognition.

April 1 A senior aide to one of Col Muammar el-Qaddafi’s sons held secret talks in London with British authorities, adding to the confusion swirling around the Tripoli regime. East of Brega, the Libyan rebels prepared for a further attempt to wrest the momentum of ground fighting away from Colonel Qaddafi’s forces after days of see-sawing advances and retreats. In Washington, President Obama’s top two national security officials signaled that the United States was unlikely to arm the rebels. Members of the NATO alliance said they had sternly warned the rebels not to attack civilians. Timeline: Qaddafi

March 31 Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi’s forces pushed rebels into a panicked retreat and seized valuable oil towns they ceded just days ago under allied airstrikes. Libya’s foreign minister, Moussa Koussa, defected to London, dealing a blow to Colonel Qaddafi’s government even as his forces made military advances. American officials revealed that the Central Intelligence Agency has inserted clandestine operatives into Libya to gather intelligence for military airstrikes and to contact and vet the beleaguered rebels.

March 30 Leaders of four dozen countries meeting in London agreed that Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi would have to relinquish power, even though regime change is not the stated aim of the United Nations resolution authorizing military action against his forces. With the momentum of ground combat tilting in favor of forces loyal to Colonel Qaddafi, rebels seeking to oust him embarked on a large-scale withdrawal from the coastal oil town of Brega, falling back toward the strategically located city of Ajdabiya. The Obama administration engaged in a fierce debate over whether to supply weapons to the rebels, with some fearful that providing arms would deepen American involvement in a civil war and that some fighters may have links to Al Qaeda.

March 29 In his first major address since ordering American airstrikes, President Obama defended the American-led military assault in Libya, saying it was in the national interest of the United States to stop a potential massacre and that the assault would be limited. An array of diplomats and public figures gathered in London to shape their political vision of a post-Qaddafi era. In Libya, rebels seeking the ouster of Colonel Quaddafi traded rocket fire with loyalist forces, who have blunted the insurgents’ westward advance. At the same time, American warplanes appeared to have opened a new line of attack on pro-Qaddafi forces, firing on three Libyan vessels off the contested western port of Misurata.
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PostSubject: am i right?   Sat 9 Apr 2011 - 12:38

dang??????????
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